Category Archives: Scholarly Reviews

My reviews of significant cultural works.

Civilization by Niall Ferguson

I recently had the pleasure of reading historian Niall Ferguson’s Civilization: The West & the Rest. I can’t recommend it highly enough. Ferguson is an acclaimed Scottish financial historian who now teaches at Harvard and seems to have a cottage … Continue reading

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Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy by Eric Metaxas

I finally finished off the engaging new biography of Dietrich Bonhoeffer by Eric Metaxas. Bonhoeffer was, of course, the Lutheran pastor and theologian who helped found the Confessing Church movement which resisted the Nazi party, and was later directly involved … Continue reading

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The War Lovers by Evan Thomas

I recently affirmed my literacy by reading The War Lovers: Roosevelt, Lodge, Hearst, and the Rush to Empire, 1898 by historian and Newsweek editor Evan Thomas. The book is a study of America‚Äôs headlong rush into the 1898 Spanish-American War, … Continue reading

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Grant and Sherman by Charles Bracelen Flood

This year’s summer reading included Charles Bracelen Flood’s excellent Grant & Sherman: The Friendship That Won the Civil War. The book is a crisp, concise examination of the the successes, failures, and character of Ulysses S. Grant and William Tecumseh … Continue reading

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Dance With Me by Winifred Madison

As you are no doubt aware, the greatest book of all time is Dance With Me by Winifred Madison. It is the timeless story of shy, lonely girl named Jennifer trying to find love in the compromised world of high … Continue reading

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Those Guys Have All The Fun by Andrew James Miller & Tom Shales

Over the past four days, I cruised through all 700-some pages of Andrew James Miller and Tom Shales’ new oral history of ESPN, entitled Those Guys Have All The Fun. While the book was zippy and provacative, I confess that … Continue reading

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